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Posted April 17, 2019.

Nicholas Strakon: Pete Buttigieg suggests state-servitude "program." For clarity, I slightly revise the title of Matthew Choi's piece at Politico: "Pete Buttigieg suggests national service program" (April 15).

I suppose none of us had much doubt about the hideousness lurking behind Boy Buttigieg's gooshy-gooshy mask.

The interesting thing is how he's on the very cutting edge of what Ronn Neff and I have dubbed Polite Totalitarianism. Check out these excerpts from Choi's article (my emphasis, of course):

"One thing we could do that would change that would be to make it, if not legally obligatory, but certainly a social norm that anybody after they're 18 spends a year in national service."
"We" could "make it" a social norm. I guess we know who "we" is. It ain't us.
Buttigieg was vague about what would constitute national service, but both he and Maddow [oh, no, my bottle of Emetrol is almost empty!] acknowledged it would most likely not be a military draft. Without saying the program would be mandatory, Buttigieg did suggest colleges and employers ask applicants about participation in it.
I'm confident the commie colleges and the commie-fascist corporations would welcome such a "suggestion," from Buttigieg or some other totalitarian president, Democrat or Republican. (Maybe even from Trump, as much as they all hate him.)

P.S. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that membership in the Hitlerjugend and the Young Pioneers was not actually mandatory, in their respective countries. Ω
 

Posted April 15, 2019.

David T. Wright: "Brazil" in Rome. In Terry Gilliam's film "Brazil," set in a dystopian, 1984-ish future, the protagonist hires an underground repairman after the mandatory state repair service botches the repair of his air conditioning in a progressively disastrous fashion. That, of course, leads to problems.

In modern Rome, a similar situation apparently exists, in which underground repairmen calling themselves "Gap" surreptitiously repair crumbling infrastructure. They must do their work in secret for fear of offending incompetent officialdom.

Of course, this story being in the Guardian, it has a slight, shall we say ... slant:

Critics might argue that citizen action like that of Gap could discourage the government from doing its job: why spend time and money to fix holes when there are residents doing it for free? But Gap members hope their intervention energises the local administration into action.
Yeah. Critics might argue. Which critics, I wonder?

It's funny that our own news media don't report this and other stories about what is happening in Europe. It's almost as if they don't want the American people to get any ideas.

The story includes a bit about an exploding city bus, which reminds me of a couple of incidents back in the 1980s, in the D.C. area, when a couple of propane-powered tour buses burst spectacularly into flames a couple of years apart — one right in front of the Old Executive Office Building where I worked at the time. I took to calling the tour bus company "Hindenburg Bus Lines."

Actually, in Rome, it's not just one city bus. It's at least 46! That means the Roman bus system deserves the moniker far more than poor Old Town Trolleys ever did. And the reason is, apparently, that diesel engines, which used to be considered wonderful, and which the regimes of most or all of the Western European countries encouraged and coerced people to buy, are now considered evil and polluting. We have always been at war with Eastasia.

So they have turned to natural- or other gas-powered buses. The problem with them is that, unlike diesel, if the gas leaks owing to ham-handed guvvamint maintenance, there's the risk of fire.

Which reminds me that I saw a Washington Metro bus just the other day that advertised that it was powered by, wait for it, hydrogen, the volatile, extremely flammable gas used in the real Hindenburg. Let's hope that the maintenance workers of the new Imperial City are a little more competent than those of the old. Ω
 

Posted April 9, 2019.

Ronn Neff: Obvious questions? Guess not. Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) has said that there is evidence of "open collusion" between Trump and Russia.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) has said that there is "ample evidence of collusion in plain sight."

Now, I didn't go to journalism school, and I've never been a prosecutor or a defense attorney, but it seems to me that the next thing out of the mouth of anyone with such a background would be: "How do you know?" After all, neither of the congressmen has seen the Mueller report yet.

The next thing I would expect to hear is, "Since you know about this evidence, why don't you just show it to us? or tell us what it is?" Ω
 

What do you think?
 
"Stop and think" archive.


 
TLD is a forum of opinion, edited by hard-core market anarchists, that does not flinch from any of the most pressing issues of our time. We are especially interested in questions of culture and ethnicity, our Polite Totalitarian ruling class, and the homicidal humanitarianism of the U.S. Empire.

Our writers include anarcho-pessimists, Old Believers in the West, unreconstructed Confederates, neo-Objectivists, and other enemies of the permanent regime. We are conscientiously indifferent to considerations of thoughtcrime. Thus, from individualist and Euro-American perspectives, we confront the end of civilization — and do our level best to name its destroyers. (More about who we are.)

— Nicholas Strakon, editor-in-chief
Ronald N. Neff, senior editor
 

WTM Enterprises
P.O. Box 224
Roanoke, IN 46783

General e-mail to The Ditch: strakon@icloud.com. (Please note change from old "thornwalker" address.)



"If this government cared about ideas, it would crack down on The Last Ditch. It could be called The Joy of Thinking."

Joe Sobran

"Whoever said 'Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty' didn't realize it, but he was thinking of The Last Ditch."

— Jared Taylor, editor of American Renaissance


Permanently recommended readings

"What Is Austrian Economics?" (Mises Institute)
"I, Pencil," by Leonard E. Read (Liberty Fund;
scroll down for text)
"The Epistemological Basis of Anarchism,"
by Roy A. Childs, Jr. (TLD)
"Polite totalitarianism," by Ronald N. Neff (TLD)


Published in 2019 by WTM Enterprises, P.O. Box 224, Roanoke, IN 46783-0224.

Please note that Thornwalker is only the "landlord" for The Last Ditch. WTM Enterprises is solely responsible for all design and content on this site.

Nicholas Strakon


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